MRN Top 25 governmental stories: Quincy City Council expresses lack of confidence, frustration with Troup over multiple issues

Farha-Troup-argue-06192023-scaled

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

Local government was rather contentious in 2023. A reflection of the frustration many feel with the polarized politics in today’s world. A lack of consensus or willingness to achieve goals for the common good unfortunately seem to prevail.

Anyway, here are the most read governmental stories of 2023, according to MRN Analytics.

1. A couple and a single woman told aldermen about issues with landlords during the Aug. 28 Quincy City Council meeting. Housing issues were a constant topic at City Council meetings this year.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

'This is a real problem, and we are real people': About-to-be-evicted tenants tell aldermen about issues with landlords

QUINCY — Two Quincy families told the Quincy City Council on Monday night they are living in sub-standard conditions in homes they are renting and claimed they will be evicted from their homes by landlords on Tuesday. Krystal Fuhrman and her husband, Zachary, spoke during the public forum at the beginning of Monday’s meeting about…
Read Full Article

2. Stacie Sparks complained to aldermen in April when a memorial she created two years ago for her son, who died in a car accident at the northeast corner of 30th and Maine, was removed by city crews. Alderman later approved roadside memorials, but nine conditions must be followed.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

'Why should a mother have to fight for a dead child?' Quincy woman asks for memorial to stay at 30th and Maine

QUINCY — Stacie Sparks says she’s received “hundreds” of compliments from Quincy Cleaners customers when she visits the memorial she created two years ago for her son, who died in a car accident at the northeast corner of 30th and Maine. “Every time I’m out there changing it, somebody stops me and says it’s beautiful,” Sparks…
Read Full Article

3. The Quincy Park District received a letter a week before its annual retreat in August from Brad Burghart, president of the Quinsippi Soccer League, proposing the donation of the 22-acre Paul Dennis Soccer Complex at 4201 State to the Park District. The Park Board eventually accepted the donation at its October meeting, with John Frankenhoff calling it the “most significant land donation” in Park District history.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

Park Board to consider donation of Paul Dennis Soccer Complex during Thursday planning retreat

QUINCY — The Quincy Park Board will discuss during its day-long retreat on Thursday whether to accept what would be one of the largest donations of land in Park District history. The Quincy Park District received a letter on Aug. 3 from Brad Burghart, president of the Quinsippi Soccer League, proposing the donation of the…
Read Full Article

4. Officer Nick Eddy and Officer Robert Megee, the past and present union presidents of the PB&PA Labor Unit 12, spoke during the July 2 meeting’s public forum about a lack of confidence in Troup’s administration. Alderman Mike Farha called the rest of the City Council “cowards” for failing to address the issue and later walked out.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

Quincy Police Unions ask for no confidence vote for Mayor Troup; Alderman Farha walks out

QUINCY — The current and past president of the union representing Quincy’s police officers asked the Quincy City Council for a vote on its confidence in the leadership of Mayor Mike Troup. As that request fell on deaf ears, it was enough to lead Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward) to walk out of Monday night’s…
Read Full Article

5. Angel Zerbonia had been on paid administrative leave since November 2022 and under investigation by an independent third party since January. The City Council voted June 8 not to retain her. Issues about Zerbonia were first addressed publicly at the Hannibal City Council meeting on Dec. 20, 2022, when a number of Hannibal residents expressed concern regarding the conduct of Zerbonia. 

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

Hannibal City Council votes unanimously not to retain city clerk

HANNIBAL, Mo. — Hannibal City Council members unanimously voted Tuesday not to retain Angel Zerbonia as city clerk. The vote was taken during a closed session meeting on Tuesday after the regularly scheduled City Council meeting. Zerbonia had been on paid administrative leave since November 2022 and under investigation by an independent third party since…
Read Full Article

6. Quincy Mayor Mike Troup heard sharp words from Alderman Mike Farha (R-4) when an invoice from a Chicago law firm for collective bargaining negotiations was discussed at the June 18 Quincy City Council meeting. Alderman Jeff Bergman (R-2) also told Troup the public doesn’t trust him during a discussion about city insurance.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

'People aren't calling you because they don't trust you'; aldermen jab at Troup over police contract, insurance problems

QUINCY — Two aldermen had sharp words for Mayor Mike Troup when an invoice from a Chicago law firm for collective bargaining negotiations was discussed at Monday’s Quincy City Council meeting. Before a vote by aldermen on a resolution to pay $8,412.15 to Ancel Glink, P.C., Richie Reis (D-6) asked for Troup to provide a…
Read Full Article

7. The Illinois Department of Transportation’s preferred route calls for an alignment utilizing the York Street Corridor, which will tie in near the Oakley Lindsay Center. An IDOT engineer said the York Street option was chosen because the cost is a little less and has a lesser impact on the property that will need to be acquired.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

IDOT reveals preferred route for new Memorial Bridge at public meeting

QUINCY— There was a packed room Thursday at the Kroc Center to weigh in on the Illinois Department of Transportation’s preferred route for the replacement for the Memorial Bridge. The route proposes an alignment utilizing the York Street Corridor, which will tie in near the Oakley Lindsay Center. Jeff Myers, regional engineer for Illinois Department…
Read Full Article

8. As the debate for passing a city budget continued, Alderman Mike Farha (R-4) asked for Quincy Mayor Mike Troup’s resignation. “I’m telling you they’re fed up,” he said. “They’re not happy about what’s going on. This isn’t working. I’ve never seen a mayor have less support amongst the public.” Troup did not resign and told Muddy River News he would wait until later in 2024 to announce whether he will seek a second term.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

'We need a serious change of direction': Hours before city budget debate, Alderman Farha calls for Mayor Troup to resign immediately

QUINCY — The senior alderman on the Quincy City Council called Mayor Mike Troup “tyrannical,” believes the public is “fed up” and says the “best thing for our community” is for him to resign immediately as a deadline to pass a city budget looms. Mike Farha, a Republican alderman in the 4th Ward since his…
Read Full Article

9. Larry Schwartz of SafeStart Environmental said June 28 work should cease inside the Adams County Courthouse after the April testing his company conducted. County officials released a recording of a Zoom meeting 12 days earlier during which Schwartz said, “Critical functions take place in this building. I mean, they have to go on.”

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

'What in the world just happened?': Adams County officials baffled by conflicting mold reports from SafeStart

QUINCY — During a June 28 Zoom meeting to discuss mold problems in the 84,000-square-foot Adams County Courthouse, Larry Schwartz of SafeStart Environmental gave his conclusions about the April testing his company conducted to the 125 people who participated online. “The real hard facts are, right now, knowing what I know, and I can’t say I’m absolutely…
Read Full Article

10. “We can’t get rid of him, we didn’t hire him, and we can’t fire him,” said Alderman Greg Fletcher (R-1). “But what we can do is shame him with this vote of no confidence to make a statement to the public that, hey, we don’t subscribe to his behavior.” The City Council voted 7-6-1 on July 9 that it no longer had confidence in the administration of Mayor Mike Troup. The action had no real consequences but sent a message that the city’s governing body wasn’t pleased with the first two years of the mayor’s first term.

Quincy Mayor Mike Troup, left, and Alderman Mike Farha (R-4th Ward), right, argue at a Quincy City Council meeting in 2023. City Asst. Corporation Counsel Bruce Alford is in the center, but would probably like to be elsewhere at this moment. — MRN FILE PHOTO

'It's time for us to stick up for our residents': Four aldermen behind decision to ask for Monday's no confidence vote in Troup

QUINCY — Both Greg Fletcher and Richie Reis know Monday’s vote regarding their confidence in Mike Troup as the mayor of Quincy is only symbolic. Regardless of the vote totals, Troup will still be the mayor at end of Monday’s meeting of the Quincy City Council. However, both aldermen believe their vote signifies something else.…
Read Full Article

The rest of the top 25

  • 11. City to begin legal action against 10 properties as part of fix-or-flatten program 
  • 12. August is over, and the answer on Troup’s decision to run for re-election as Quincy’s mayor is … 
  • 13. QPD officer says mayor lied about why secondary insurance policy was canceled; aldermen to vote on investigation next week 
  • 14. Aldermen deny permit for operation of nightclub at Sixth and Hampshire 
  • 15. Ordinance requiring compliance with federal abortion laws attracts huge crowd; 3-plus-hour meeting ends with aldermen voting against it 
  • 16. ‘This is a public health safety issue’: Quincy attorney, judge want comprehensive tests done on courthouse 
  • 17. Culbertson out as Vets’ Home administrator 
  • 18. After debate heats up last Monday, aldermen expected to vote on proposed south-side duplex 
  • 19. Troup says local investors’ bid on former Newcomb Hotel lot includes plans to build eight three-story townhouses 
  • 20. Troup provides updates on police contract and Yates investigation, says Farha ‘showed true colors’ last week 
  • 21. ‘This city needs leadership’: Former alderman Brink becomes first to declare candidacy for Quincy mayor 
  • 22. Canton mayor resigns; city officials claim Lewis County officials are engaged in ‘hostile takeover’ 
  • 23. Quincy City Council to take ‘no confidence’ vote on Mayor Troup 
  • 24. Aldermen vote to allow memorials in city right-of-way, but Quincy woman perturbed with new rules 
  • 25. Summer downtown concert series needs City Council approval; Troup says former Newcomb Hotel lot on verge of being sold 

Miss Clipping Out Stories to Save for Later?

Click the Purchase Story button below to order a print of this story. We will print it for you on matte photo paper to keep forever.

Current Weather

SAT
48°
40°
SUN
69°
40°
MON
75°
54°
TUE
75°
27°
WED
43°
27°

Trending Stories